Commentary : Verse 45
 

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45. " O my father! I fear lest a chastisement afflict you from the Beneficent (Allah) so that you become a friend to Satan."

Commentary:

Through this holy verses once more Abraham attracts the attention of 'A-zar to the evil sequels of polytheism and idolatry, when he says:

" O my father! I fear lest a chastisement afflict you from the Beneficent (Allah) so that you become a friend to Satan."

The statement of Abraham, here, before his uncle, 'A-zar, is very attractive. On one side, he frequently addresses him with the phrase: 'O my father' which is a sign of respect and courtesy. On the other side, the holy phrase 'I fear lest a chastisement afflict you ' indicates that Abraham is worried that any disquiet reaches 'A-zar.

And on the third side, the phrase 'a chastisement afflict you from the Beneficent (Allah)' points to this matter that due to his polytheism and idolatry, 'A-zar's state has reached a point that Allah, whose general compassion has encompassed everybody, becomes angry with him and punishes him. 'A-zar has to note what a horrible thing he does! And, on the fourth said, his deed is an action of which is to go under the shade of the friendship of Satan.

Note:

1. Allah (s.w.t.) says: "And as for those who belie Our Signs, chastisement shall afflict them for what they were transgressing." (Sura Al-'An'am, No. 6, verse 49)

2. Allah, the Exalted, says: "and We seized those who were unjust with a dreadful punishment for the transgressions they used to commit." (Sura Al-'A'rAf, No. 7, verse 165)

3. The Messenger of Allah (p.b.u.h.) said: "Whoever causes the most grievous torture for people in this life, he will have the most grievous punishment with Allah on the Day of Hereafter." (Nahj-ul-Fasahah, p. 59; & Kanz-ul-'Ummal, vol.3, p. 500)

Commentary : Verse 46



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46. " He said: 'Do you dislike my gods O' Abraham? If you do not desist, I will certainly stone you. Be gone from me for a long time'. "

Commentary:

In the former verses, the logical words of Abraham (a.s.) alongside the guidance of 'A-zar which were mixed with a particular compassion and kindness, were referred to. Now, the turn is for the answers of 'A-zar to those words, so that, by comparing them both, the fact may become manifest.

The Qur'an implies that, not only the sympathetic and helpful statements of Abraham did not affect on 'A-zar's heart, but also, by hearing them, he became very angry and said to Abraham whether he hated his gods.

" He said: 'Do you dislike my gods O Abraham? If you do not desist, I will certainly stone you. Be gone from me for a long time'. "

It is interesting that, firstly, 'A-zar was not even willing to hear the denial upon the idols, or to utter any opposition and ill-speaking against them, but he only said: "Do you dislike my gods?" lest the idols be aspersed. Secondly, when 'A-zar wanted to threaten Abraham, he threatened him to stoning, and he emphasized on his action by the word 'certainly'; and we know that stoning is one of the worst kind of slaying. Thirdly, he did not suffice to this conditioned threat, but, at the same time, he considered Abraham as an unbearable being when he told him 'Be gone from me for a long time'. This is a very aspersive meaning that sometimes some angry persons use against their opponents.

The Arabic term /maliyya/ is derived from /'imla'/ in the sense of 'to respite a long time'.



Commentary : Verse 47


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47. " He said: 'Peace be upon you: I will ask my Lord to forgive you: for verily He is ever affectionate to me'."

Commentary:

The word /haqq/ is applied for the person who regards the complete goodness and benevolence unto another person;(1) and sometimes it is used in the sense of 'a scholar'.

In these verses, the spiritual conditions of a believer and those of a disbeliever are clearly seen in their disputes.

1. Abraham speaks affectionately, while his uncle speaks roughly. Abraham addresses his uncle four times with the phrase "O my father!" but his idolatrous uncle, even once, did not call him 'O my son'.

2. Abraham (a.s.) speaks reasonably, while 'A-zar speaks without reasonless. Abraham says: "Why do you worship that which neither hears nor sees?",(2) but 'A-zar says "my gods"(3)

3. Abraham (a.s.) speaks sympathetically, but 'A-zar answers with threat.

4. Abraham (a.s.) greets his uncle, but 'A-zar orders him to get distance with him by saying: "Be gone from me for a long time."(4)

1- Lesan-ul-'Arab, an Arabic Dictionary
2- The current Sura, verse 42
3- The current Sura, verse 46
4- Ibid

But, like all other divine prophets and leaders, Abraham controlled his nervousness and, in spite of 'A-zar's intensive harshness, he, with utmost magnanimity, said:

" He said: 'Peace be upon you: "

This salutation may be for farewell, by which and together with some other words, Abraham left 'A-zar; or it may be a salutation which is said for the end of disputation.

Then Abraham added:

" I will ask my Lord to forgive you: for verily He is ever affectionate to me'."

Abraham (a.s.) asked forgiveness for his idolatrous uncle for the sake that he probabled that 'A-zar would be guided, but, as soon as he became disappointed from his uncle's guidance, he repudiated him.